It is recommended by the WHO and CDC to get optimally prepared before traveling.

We can help with your travel health needs. Consultations, Vaccinations, and more.

Need an international certificate of vaccination for your trip? We can issue you one!

 

We are sorry but we currently do NOT have yellow fever vaccine in stock.

How it works

Travel health consultations and recommendations based on your customized itinerary

Transparancy is our way

We will clearly mention any costs and will not have any surprises. You can even pay for your appointment and vaccinations you need before the visits.

We do not take insurance for most vaccinations. Why?

Most insurance companies do not cover travel-related appointments and vaccinations. You can however try to get reimbursed by submitting it to your insurance company.

We can usually take insurance for your flu shot.

Our goal is to deliver the best customer experience.

Check our self-pay price by clicking here:

A personalized report and consultation with a healthcare provider. A full look at the health and safety recommendations of the visiting countries according to your itinerary. For 1 adult. 30 mins

This is required for each visit and is value-added replacement to the usual fee at other clinics.

$39.99

Includes 2 Adults and 2 children (18 years or younger) Additional children are a $15 per (3 max)

Please call before booking this as we must assess the age of the kids and ensure we can render services such as vaccinations to them,

$69.99

Made from inactive bacteria, the injectable typhoid vaccine provides protection for up to two years. This vaccine is approved for use in individuals over two-years-old.

$129.99

Learn more about Typhoid Fever by clicking here: Learn More

Hepatitis A is a virus affecting the liver. It usually spreads through contaminated food or water. It is acute condition (not chronic). Symptoms can appear from two to six weeks after exposure. The Hepatitis A vaccine is one of the best define against the virus, especially for travelers. 

$89.99

Learn more about Meningitis by clicking here:  Learn More

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Made as two different types:  A, C, W and Y strains or B Strains vaccine

Most often needed to traveler going to pilgrimage Hajj and/or Ummrah.

$129.99

Learn more about Meningitis by clicking here:  Learn More

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From the Vaccine Information Statement

1. What is Typhoid?

Typhoid (typhoid fever) is a serious disease. It is caused by bacteria called Salmonella Typhi. 

Typhoid causes a high fever, fatigue, weakness, stomach pains, headache, loss of appetite, and sometimes a rash. If it is not treated, it can kill up to 30% of people who get it.

Some people who get typhoid become “carriers,” who can spread the disease to others.

Generally, people get typhoid from contaminated food or water. Typhoid is rare in the U.S., and most U.S. citizens who get the disease get it while traveling. Typhoid strikes about 21 million people a year around the world and kills about 200,000.

2. Typhoid vaccines

Typhoid vaccine can prevent typhoid.

There are two vaccines to prevent typhoid. One is an inactivated (killed) vaccine gotten as a shot. 

The other is a live, attenuated (weakened) vaccine which is taken orally (by mouth).

3. Who should get typhoid vaccine and when?

Routine typhoid vaccination is not recommended in the United States, but typhoid vaccine is recommended for:

Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot)

Live typhoid vaccine (oral)

Either vaccine may safely be given at the same time as other vaccines.

4. Some people should not get typhoid vaccine or should wait.

Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot)

Live typhoid vaccine (oral)

- has HIV/AIDS or another disease that affects the immune system,

- is being treated with drugs that affect the immune system, such as steroids for 2 weeks or longer,

- has any kind of cancer,

- is taking cancer treatment with radiation or drugs.

 

5. What are the risks from typhoid vaccine?

Like any medicine, a vaccine could cause a serious problem, such as a severe allergic reaction. The risk of typhoid vaccine causing serious harm, or death, is extremely small. Serious problems from either typhoid vaccine are very rare.

Inactivated typhoid vaccine (shot)

Mild reactions

Live typhoid vaccine (oral)

Mild reactions

6. What if there is a serious reaction?

What should I look for?

What should I do?

VAERS is only for reporting reactions. They do not give medical advice.

Download the Vaccine Information Statement (VIS) handout by clicking here: typhoid

From the Vaccine Information Statement - CDC

1. Why get vaccinated?

Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease. It is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is spread from person to person through contact with the feces (stool) of people who are infected, which can easily happen if someone does not wash his or her hands properly.  You can also get hepatitis A from food, water, or objects contaminated with HAV.

Symptoms of hepatitis A can include:

These symptoms usually appear 2 to 6 weeks after exposure and usually last less than 2 months, although some people can be ill for as long as 6 months. If you have hepatitis A you may be too ill to work.

Children often do not have symptoms, but most adults do. You can spread HAV without having symptoms.

Hepatitis A can cause liver failure and death, although this is rare and occurs more commonly in persons 50 years of age or older and persons with other liver diseases, such as hepatitis B or C.

Hepatitis A vaccine can prevent hepatitis A. Hepatitis A vaccines were recommended in the United States beginning in 1996. Since then, the number of cases reported each year in the U.S. has dropped from around 31,000 cases to fewer than 1,500 cases.

2. Hepatitis A vaccine

Hepatitis A vaccine is an inactivated (killed) vaccine. You will need 2 doses for long-lasting protection. These doses should be given at least 6 months apart.

Children are routinely vaccinated between their first and second birthdays (12 through 23 months of age).  Older children and adolescents can get the vaccine after 23 months. Adults who have not been vaccinated previously and want to be protected against hepatitis A can also get the vaccine.

You should get hepatitis A vaccine if you:

Ask your healthcare provider if you want more information about any of these groups.

There are no known risks to getting hepatitis A vaccine at the same time as other vaccines.

3. Some people should not get this vaccine 

Tell the person who is giving you the vaccine:

If you ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a dose of hepatitis A vaccine, or have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, you may be advised not to get vaccinated. Ask your health care provider if you want information about vaccine components.    

If you have a mild illness, such as a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today. If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover. Your doctor can advise you.

 

Download the Vaccine Information Sheet by clicking here: Hepatitis A

From the Vaccine Information Sheet - CDC

1. Why get vaccinated?

Meningococcal disease is a serious illness caused by a type of bacteria called Neisseria meningitidis.  It can lead to meningitis (infection of the lining of the brain and spinal cord) and infections of the blood. Meningococcal disease often occurs without warning – even among people who are otherwise healthy.

Meningococcal disease can spread from person to person through close contact (coughing or kissing) or lengthy contact, especially among people living in the same household.

There are at least 12 types of N. meningitidis, called “serogroups.”  Serogroups A, B, C, W, and Y cause most meningococcal disease.

Anyone can get meningococcal disease but certain people are at increased risk, including:

Even when it is treated, meningococcal disease kills 10 to 15 infected people out of 100.  And of those who survive, about 10 to 20 out of every 100 will suffer disabilities such as hearing loss, brain damage, kidney damage, amputations, nervous system problems, or severe scars from skin grafts.

Meningococcal ACWY vaccine can help prevent meningococcal disease caused by serogroups A, C, W, and Y.  A different meningococcal vaccine is available to help protect against serogroup B.

2. Meningococcal ACWY Vaccine

Meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MenACWY) is licensed by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for protection against serogroups A, C, W, and Y. 

Two doses of MenACWY are routinely recommended for adolescents 11 through 18 years old: the first dose at 11 or 12 years old, with a booster dose at age 16.  Some adolescents, including those with HIV, should get additional doses. Ask your health care provider for more information.  

In addition to routine vaccination for adolescents, MenACWY vaccine is also recommended for certain groups of people:

Some people need multiple doses for adequate protection. Ask your health care provider about the number and timing of doses, and the need for booster doses. 

3. Some people should not get this vaccine

Tell the person who is giving you the vaccine if you have any severe, life-threatening allergies.  If you have ever had a life-threatening allergic reaction after a previous dose of meningococcal ACWY vaccine, or if you have a severe allergy to any part of this vaccine, you should not get this vaccine.  Your provider can tell you about the vaccine’s ingredients.

 

Not much is known about the risks of this vaccine for a pregnant woman or breastfeeding mother.  However, pregnancy or breastfeeding are not reasons to avoid MenACWY vaccination. A pregnant or breastfeeding woman should be vaccinated if she is at increased risk of meningococcal disease.

If you have a mild illness, such as a cold, you can probably get the vaccine today.  If you are moderately or severely ill, you should probably wait until you recover. Your doctor can advise you.

 

Download the Vaccine Information Sheet by clicking here: meningitis